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Yom Kippur Service

Temple Beth El, Hammonton

October 12, 2016   10:00 am

There are No Guest Tickets required for High Holy Day services at Temple Beth El.  Donations are accepted and very much appreciated.  All are welcome, please invite your family and friends to join us as we celebrate together!

We will be collecting non-perishable food items for the needy.

Childcare available on advance request!

While RSVPs are helpful they are not required.

email info@tbenj.org

Erev Yom Kippur/Kol Nidre

Temple Beth El, Hammonton

October 11, 2016   7:00 PM

There are No Guest Tickets required for High Holy Day services at Temple Beth El.  Donations are accepted and very much appreciated.  All are welcome, please invite your family and friends to join us as we celebrate together!

We will be collecting non-perishable food items for the needy.

Childcare available on advance request!

While RSVPs are helpful they are not required.

email info@tbenj.org

Dinner: Pot-Luck Before the Fast

October 11, 2016   5:30 PM  (Set up at 4:45)

Join us at Temple Beth El starting at 5:30 PM through 7:00 PM,

as we share dinner together before Erev Yom Kippur/Kol Nidre service and the start of our Fast.

Our Pot-Luck dinner is non-dairy, meat.

Bring your family and friends AND a dish to share with your Temple Beth El family.

Tashlich

Join us for Tashlich following Rosh Hashanah services and lunch:

Monday Oct 3, 2016

Services at 10

Lunch at 12

Tashlich at 1:30

Taschlich at Hammonton Lake Park at 1:30 PM.

Rosh Hashanah Day 1

Temple Beth El, Hammonton

Join us for Holiday Services, Monday Oct 3, 2016  at 10:00 am

Pot-luck lunch to follow service.

Taschlich at Hammonton Lake Park at 1:30 PM.

TBE Hammonton

No tickets necessary

Childcare for children under 6 available upon advance request!
For information email info@tbenj.org

Message from our President

Steve Schwartz

Shalom.

When I was a young, Jewish kid growing up in Northeast Philadelphia faking stomach cramps every Tuesday and Thursday to avoid having to go to Hebrew School, I figured the chances of me becoming president of a synagogue one day, were about as remote as Judge Judy playing in the NFL.

But this being America, as it is, that actually happened. Talk about a mechayah. Sadly, my Dad didn’t live to see this, but thankfully, Mom did. When I told her the good news, she said, “Every Tuesday and Thursday – for five, long years – you tore my heart out about going to Hebrew School. I was just happy to live long enough to see you become a Bar Mitzvah – and now look, he’s a gontza knacher – the president of a synagogue!”

In truth, I was quite humbled when approached about being president of Temple Beth El. After all, holding such a lofty position in a synagogue, was, at least to my mind, reserved for only the most Jewish savvy and learned members of the congregation. Thankfully, my fellow members of the Temple Beth El board decided to think outside the box.

For me, Temple Beth El is a very special place. It is near and dear to the hearts of myself and my wonderful wife, Karen. With our most special TBE moments coming when our lovely daughters – Alexis and Nicole- were called upon to be a Bat Mitzvah. Thankfully, they did not succumb to those psychosomatic pre-teen years, that had befallen their father. And, unlike Dad, they both thoroughly enjoyed the rather unique learning experience at Temple Beth El.

Hebrew School, however, is but one aspect of what makes Temple Beth El a special place.

Both of our girls were meticulously groomed for their big day by our spiritual director, Abby Michaleski, who – for Temple Beth El – has truly been a gift from God. Abby is a gifted communicator and to watch her conduct one of her wonderful ecumenical services, is a sight to behold. If you’ve never had an opportunity to see Abby for yourself, may I suggest that there’s not a better time than during the upcoming High Holy Days.

There will be no need to purchase tickets to attend, as the doors to our sanctuary will be open to you and yours. All that is required to participate in High Holy Days services, is your presence. We always enjoy meeting new friends. Hopefully, we can add you to our ever-expanding list.

I would like to take this opportunity to wish you and your family a year brimming with abundant amounts of peace, love, health, happiness – and much nachas, too.

Please remember that love is the answer – as only love can conquer hate. So, let us all live and be well!

Warmest personal regards,

Stephen

Message from our Spiritual Leader

Abby Michaleski

Abby Michaleski

“And the seasons they go ‘round and ‘round. And the painted ponies go up and down. We’re captive on a carousel of time. We can’t return, we can only look behind from where we came and go ‘round and ‘round and ‘round in the circle game.”

Joni Mitchell’s song keeps going ‘round and ‘round in my mind as I write this in the dead heat of summer and look ahead to the days of fall. Before we know it, the weather will cool and the leaves will begin to turn and the Jewish month of ELUL will call us to blow the Shofar and prepare for the High Holy Days.

In addition to the spiritual and historical meanings of all the Jewish holidays, the calendar cycle is intimately tied to the earth and the turning of the seasons. When our ancestors were farmers they watched the moon to plant and sow, to bring in Shabbat and celebrate the holidays, and they “came close” to the source of all blessings through the offering of their produce and their livestock. In our post-modern world, we are no less dependent on nature’s gifts cycles than our ancestors were three thousand years ago; we’ve just put so many layers between us and the earth that we often lose the connection. Judaism brings us back to the organicity of our lives; celebrating with the cycle of the moon, connecting with the seasons through the sights, sounds, smells and foods of our holidays and staying conscious to the transitions throughout our lives. Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur help to remind us, not only “from where we came”, but where we are and where we are going.

I hope you will join us on the High Holy Days, and of course throughout the year, as we celebrate the transition from this past year into the next and we use the ancient wisdom and rituals of our people to take an ever so important spiritual accounting of our lives.

May you all have a sweet and blessed entry into the new year of 5773.

Abby

Click here to hear Abby chant a niggun.

(A niggun is a wordless melody. This niggun is attributed to the 18th century chasidic Rabbi known as the Maggid of Mezritch.)